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Shakespeare All Quotes and Sayings

William Shakespeare

Born: Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England, The United Kingdom
Died: April 23, 1616
Website: http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org
Genre: TheatreClassicsPoetry

William Shakespeare (absolved 26 April 1564) was an English artist and dramatist, broadly viewed as the best author in the English language and the world’s pre-prominent playwright. He is regularly called England’s public writer and the “Poet of Avon” (or essentially “The Bard”). His enduring works comprise of 38 plays, 154 pieces, two long story sonnets, and a few different sonnets. His plays have been converted into each significant living language, and are performed more regularly than those of some other dramatist.

Shakespeare was brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon. Researchers accept that he passed on his fifty-second birthday celebration, concurring with St George’s Day.

At 18 years old he wedded Anne Hathaway, who bore him three kids: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Somewhere in the range of 1585 and 1592 he started a fruitful vocation in London as an entertainer, author, and part proprietor of the playing organization the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. He seems to have resigned to Stratford around 1613, where he passed on three years after the fact. Barely any records of Shakespeare’s private life endure, and there has been impressive hypothesis about such matters as his sexuality, strict convictions, and regardless of whether the works credited to him were composed by others.

Shakespeare created the majority of his known work somewhere in the range of 1590 and 1613. His initial plays were fundamentally comedies and accounts, classifications he raised to the pinnacle of complexity and masterfulness before the finish of the sixteenth century. Next he composed fundamentally misfortunes until around 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, thought about the absolute best models in the English language. In his last stage, he composed tragicomedies, otherwise called sentiments, and teamed up with different writers. Large numbers of his plays were distributed in versions of differing quality and precision during his lifetime, and in 1623, two of his previous dramatic associates distributed the First Folio, a gathered release of his sensational works that incorporated everything except two of the plays now perceived as Shakespeare’s.

Shakespeare was a regarded artist and dramatist in his own day, yet his standing didn’t ascend to its current statures until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, specifically, acclaimed Shakespeare’s virtuoso, and the Victorians legend venerated Shakespeare with a love that George Bernard Shaw called “bardolatry”. In the 20th century, his work was more than once embraced and rediscovered by new developments in grant and execution. His plays remain exceptionally well known today and are reliably performed and reevaluated in different social and political settings all through the world.

As indicated by history specialists, Shakespeare composed 37 plays and 154 pieces all through the range of his life. Shakespeare’s composing normal was 1.5 plays a year since he initially began writing in 1589. There have been plays and pieces ascribed to Shakespeare that were not legitimately composed by the extraordinary expert of language and writing.

“Nothing can come of nothing.”

“William Shakespeare All Quotes and Sayings”

  1.  “Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.”
  2. “We know what we are, but know not what we may be.”
  3. “Sweet is the uses of adversity which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious jewel in his head.”
  4. “Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.”
  5. “Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.”
  6. “Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.”
  7. “How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?”
  8. “Nothing can come of nothing.”
  9. “How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.”
  10. “What’s done can’t be undone.”
  11. “Though she is but little, she is fierce.”
  12. “No legacy is as rich as honesty.”
  13. “This above all; to thane own self are true.”
  14. “I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.”
  15. “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”
  16. “One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.”
  17. “What is past is prologue.”
  18. “Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.”
  19. “Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.”
  20. “We know what we are, but know not what we may be.”
  21. “Sweet is the uses of adversity which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious jewel in his head.”
  22. “Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.”
  23. “Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.”
  24. “Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.”
  25. “How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?”
  26. “Nothing can come of nothing.”
  27. “How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.”
  28. “What’s done can’t be undone.”
  29. “Though she is but little, she is fierce.”
  30. “No legacy is as rich as honesty.”
  31. “This above all; to thane own self is true.”
  32. “I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.”
  33. “The robbed that smiles, steals something from the thief.”
  34. “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”
  35. “One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.”
  36. “What is past is prologue.”
  37. “Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.”
  38. “Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.”
  39. “Tis not enough to help the feeble up, but to support them after.”
  40. “Neither a borrower nor a lender be.”
  41. “Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.”
  42. “I bear a charmed life.”
  43. “Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot that it does singe yourself.”
  44. “Talking isn’t doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds.”
  45. “In time we hate that which we often fear.”
  46. “Modest doubt is called the beacon of the wise.”
  47. “With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.”
  48. “Boldness is my friend.”
  49. “Words without thoughts never to heaven go.”
  50. “Wisely and slow. They stumble that run fast.”
  51. “Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.”
  52. “When words are scarce they are seldom spent in vain.”
  53. “Such as we are made of, such we be.”
  54. “And oftentimes excusing of a fault doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.”
  55. “Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving.”
  56. “To be, or not to be: that is the question.”
  57. “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts.”
  58. “All that glisters is not gold.”
  59. “Words are easy, like the wind; faithful friends are hard to find.”
  60. “The fault…is not in our stars, but in ourselves.”
  61. “And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.”
  62. “Expectation is the root of all heartache.”
  63. “I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it.”
  64. “Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.”
  65. “Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”
  66. “My tongue will tell the anger of my heart, or else my heart concealing it will break.”
  67. “Brevity is the soul of wit.”
  68. “Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak knits up o-er wrought heart and bids it break.”
  69. “Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under it.”
  70. “One may smile, and smile, be a villain.”
  71. “Conscience doth make cowards of us all.”
  72. “Let me be that I am and seek not to alter me.”
  73. “Et tu, Brute?”
  74. “O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; it is the green-ey’d monster, which doth mock the meat it feeds on.”
  75. “If we are true to ourselves, we can not be false to anyone.”
  76. “Be great in act, as you have been in thought.”
  77. “Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.”
  78. “All things are ready, if our mind be so.”
  79. “Many a true word hath been spoken in jest.”
  80. “For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.”
  81. “The Devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape.”
  82. “Thought is free.”
  83. “April hath put a spirit of youth in everything.”
  84. “Summer’s lease hath all too short a date.”
  85. “Our bodies are our gardens to the wills are gardeners.”
  86. “The tempter or the tempted, who sins most?”
  87. “Men should be what they seem.”
  88. “He jests at scars that never felt a wound.”
  89. “I would not wish any companion in the world but you.”
  90. “Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, as self-neglecting.”
  91. “Doubt thou the stars are fire, doubt that the sun doth move. Doubt truth to be a liar, but never doubt I love.”
  92. “I am one who loved not wisely but too well.”
  93. “A young woman in love always looks like patience on a monument smiling at grief.”
  94. “My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep; the more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite.”
  95. “They do not love that do not show their love.”
  96. “I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.”
  97. “Love is heavy and light, bright and dark, hot and cold, sick and healthy, asleep and awake.”
  98. “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art lovelier and more temperate.”
  99. “Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.”
  100. “Kindness in women, not their beauteous looks, shall win my love.”
  101. “Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, and therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.”
  102. “Do not swear by the moon, for she changes constantly. Then your love would also change.”
  103. “If music be the food of love, play on.”
  104. “Love is too young to know what conscience is.”
  105. “Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.”
  106. “Don’t waste your love on somebody, who doesn’t value it.”
  107. “And yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.”
  108. “Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs.”
  109. “Go to your bosom: Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know.”
  110. “In black ink my love may still shine bright.”
  111. “Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, but bears it out even to the edge of doom.”
  112. “See how she leans her cheek upon her hand. O, that I was a glove upon that hand that I might touch that cheek!”
  113. “The course of true love never did run smooth.”
  114. “Love sought is good, but given unsought, is better.”
  115. “For which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me?”
  116. “Speak low, if you speak love.”
  117. “Love comforted like sunshine after rain.”
  118. “Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it is morrow.”
  119. “So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, so long lives this and this give life to thee.”
  120. “For you, in my respect, is the entire world.”
  121. “Love is merely madness.”
  122. “Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds.”
  123. “How art thou out of breath when thou hast breath to say to me that thou art out of breath?”
  124. “I wish my horse had the speed of your tongue.”
  125. “Do you not know I am a woman? When I think, I must speak.”
  126. “I can see that he’s not in your good books,’ said the messenger. ‘No, and if he were I would burn my library.’”
  127. “God has given you one face, and you make yourself another.”
  128. “Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.”
  129. “He that loves to be flattered is worthy o’ the flatterer.”
  130. “Life is as tedious as twice-told tale, vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.”
  131. “Maids want nothing but husbands, and when they have them, they want everything.”
  132. “O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call the devil.”
  133. 116. “Lord, what fools these mortals are!”
  134. “I will praise any man that will praise me.”
  135. “My pride fell with my fortunes.”
  136. “Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.”
  137. “Is it not strange that desire should so many years outlive performance?”
  138. “I dote on his very absence.”
  139. “There’s many a man has more hair than wit.”
  140. “Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.”
  141.  “A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows him to be a fool.”
  142. “I am not bound to please thee with my answer.”
  143. “In time we hate that which we often fear.”
  144. “We are time’s subjects, and time bids be gone.”
  145. “All other doubts, by time let them be cleared: Fortune brings in some boats that are not steered.”
  146. “A man may fish with the worm that hath eaten of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm.” 
  147. “Come what come May, time and the hour run through the roughest day.”
  148. “How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?”
  149. “Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, it seems to me most strange that men should fear; seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come.”
  150. “There are many events in the womb of time, which will be delivered.”
  151. “I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.”
  152. “Summer’s lease hath all too short a date.”
  153. “And nothing ‘gains Time’s scythe can make defense; Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.”
  154. “Many a man his life hath sold but my outside to behold. Gilded tombs do worms enfold.”
  155. “What’s past is prologue.”
  156. “One fairer than my love! The all-seeing sun ne’er saw her match since first the world begun.”
  157. “The course of true love never did run smooth.”
  158. “Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, and therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.”
  159. “A lover’s eyes will gaze an eagle blind. A lover’s ear will hear the lowest sound.”
  160. “And yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.”
  161. “Is love a tender thing? It is too rough, too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like a thorn.”
  162. “What’s mine is yours, and what is yours is mine.”
  163. “Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove: O no! It is an ever-fixed mark that looks on tempests and is never shaken.”
  164. “My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep; the more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite.”
  165. “Love sought is good, but given unsought better.”
  166.  “They do not love that do not show their love.”
  167. “Journeys end in lovers meeting, every wise man’s son doth know.”
  168. “And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.”
  169. “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players; they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.” 
  170. “No legacy is as rich as honesty.”
  171. “We know what we are, but know not what we may be.”
  172. “This above all; to thane own self are true.”
  173. “For there is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.”
  174. “Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot that it does singe yourself.”
  175. “Thou know the first time that we smell the air we wall and cry. When we are born we cry, that we are come to this great state of fools.”
  176. “Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more.”
  177. “Things won are done; joy’s soul lies in the doing.”
  178. “Life is as tedious as twice-told tale, vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.”
  179. “Life every man holds dear; but the brave man holds honor far more precious-dear than life.”
  180. “We are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep.”  
  181. “I do desire we may be better strangers.”
  182. “You are not worth another word else I’d call you knave.”
  183. “In his brain—which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage—he hath strange places crammed with observation, the he vents in mangled forms.”
  184. “He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man. He that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him.”
  185. “I pray you; do not fall in love with me, for I am falser than vows made in wine. Besides, I like you not.”
  186. “I never see thy face but I think upon hell-fire.”
  187. “You are not worth the dust which the rude wind blows in your face.”
  188. “O let me kiss that hand!’… ‘Let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality.’”
  189. “How well he’s read, to reason against reading!”
  190. “What, you egg!”
  191. “I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow, than a man swears he loves me.”
  192. “There’s many a man has more hair than wit.”
  193. “Thou sodden-witted lord! Thou hast no more brain than I have in mine elbows.”

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